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Messa di voce (SI)

When: Saturday, 20. 8. 2022 at 20:00 Fully booked

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Messa di voce (SI)

Urška Cvetko: recorder
Mojca Jerman: violin
Izidor Erazem Grafenauer: baroque guitar, theorbo

Guest of the evening
Johanna Lopez Valencia (CO): viol

Artists’ message to visitors

In the research of the Early Baroque, at the crossroads of the Baroque and the Renaissance, with its liveliness, mischievousness, as well as drama and pathos, a genre emerges whose importance is often overlooked today. Fantastic style or "Stylus fantasticus" lays the foundations for later musical creation with the birth of instrumental canzonas or sonatas and therefore also birth of instrumental suite, concerto, concerto grosso, opera, basso continuo, and so on. The sweetness and mischievousness of recorders is intertwined with the virtuosic nobility of the violin, while the rhythmic beat of baroque guitar and aristocratic theorbo combines everything into an ambivalent basis, typical of a period that does not belong here or there.

 

The mission statement of the ensemble

With the project, the ensemble pays tribute to composers who were pioneers of their time and significantly marked and contributed to the change in development of classical music until today. They are distinguished by a rich imagination and sensuality, and at the same time they leave an open space for the musician's own expression. 

 

Recording: Radio Slovenija

Winemaker of Seviqc Brežice 2022 concerts: Family winery Jakončič, Kozana, Goriška Brda

Event programme

 

Stylus fantasticus. In research of early baroque and improvisation.
The Stylus fantasticus project is co-financed by the City of Ljubljana.

 

Giovanni Girolamo Kapsberger (1580-1651):
Sonata prima arpeggiata 
(Libro Primo d'Intavolatura di Chitarrone, Venetia 1604)

Tarquinio Merula (1595-1665):
Ciaccona
(Canzoni overo sonate concertate per chiesa e camera a due e a tre, Op. 12, Venezia 1637)

Biagio Marini (1594-1663):
Passacaglio a 3
(Sonate da Chiesa e da Camera a due, tre e quattro, Opera XXII, Venetia 1655)

Marco Uccellini (1603/10-1680):
Sonata quarta a violino solo detta ‘la Hortensia virtuosa’
(Sonate, Correnti e Arie a 1, 2, 3, Opera IV, Venezia)

Marco Uccellini (1603/10-1680):
Sonata overo toccata sesta a violino solo detta la mia Signora 
(Sonate, Correnti e Arie a 1, 2, 3, Opera quarta, Venezia 1645)

Antonio Bertali (1605-1669):
Sonata a 3
(Partitur-Buch Ludwig, 1662)

Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583-1643):
Canzon Prima a Due Canti e Basso
(Canzoni da sonare a una, due, tre et quattro, Venezia 1634)

Marco Uccellini (1603/10-1680): 
Aria sopra la Bergamasca
(Sonate, Correnti e Arie a 1, 2, 3, Opera IV, Venezia)

*******

Christopher Simpson (ca.1602-1669):
Division in G
(The Division Viol, London 1659)

Biagio Marini (1594-1663):
Sonata sopra la fuggi dolente
(Sonate da Chiesa e da Camera a due, tre e quattro, Opera XXII, Venetia 1655)

Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583-1643):
Canzon Seconda a Due Canti e Basso
(Canzoni da sonare a una, due, tre et quattro, Venezia 1634)

Giovanni Antonio Pandolfi Mealli (1624-ca.1687):
Sonata prima 'La Bernabea'
(Sonate a violino solo per chiesa e camera, Op. 3)

Giovanni Antonio Pandolfi Mealli (1624-ca.1687):
Sonata sesta 'La Vinciolina'
(Sonate a violino solo per chiesa e camera, Op. 3)

Antonio Bertali (1605-1669):
Sonata a 3
(Partitur-Buch Ludwig, Gotha 1662)

Tarquinio Merula (1595-1665):
Canzona a 2 violini, La Caravagia
(Canzoni overo sonate concertate per chiesa e camera a due e a tre, Op. 12, Venezia 1637)

Giovanni Girolamo Kapsberger (1580-1651):
Sonata seconda arpeggiata 
(Libro Primo d'Intavolatura di Chitarrone, Venetia 1604)

 

About the concert programme

At the crossroads between the pure polyphonic lines of the Renaissance and the solo extravagance of the Baroque era is a pearl called "Stylus fantasticus" or Fantastic Style, which characterizes the instrumental music of the 17th century. The ideal of the Renaissance and music until the 17th century was the human voice, and the instruments were there mainly to accompany it. Stylus fantasticus for the first time in history puts the instrument and the instrumentalist in the lead role, so the early instrumental sonatas are still called canzone (cantare = to sing, suonare = to play). In them, he presents the expressive abilities of the instrument, its virtuosity, and replaces the narrative element (previously represented by the text) with dramatic, temperamental passages, exclamations and contrasts in tempo, dynamics and free form build. A freer form constitutes of shorter movements (Adagio, Allegro, Adagio, Presto) that do not yet divide a sonata (like we are used in later works) into four or more pieces. They instead flow into each other, change metrum and character. Sometimes also very quickly and in contrasts; a single sentence can last a single line or a pair of pages. These works have not yet been specified to be played by one specific instrument: a practice remains from the Renaissance in which the instrumentalists were able to perform works on any instrument available, as long as it was in the same ambitious as written (e.g. violins would be swapped with recorders or cornetti; Viola da gambas with cellos or bassoons, etc.). Specifications can already be found in our programme, but on the covers of each original it is still written: Sonate per violino o altri strumenti e basso continuo. Also interesting are three, four or more voiced instrumental canzones that look like vocal works of the time but are textless. They are also characterized by short and contrasting sentences that change the meter and character, dynamics are not yet common, diminusions (passaggi from the Renaissance), trills, groppi, appogiatture are written, so they are an important document on the practice of embellishment of that time.

Giovanni Girolamo Kapsberger (1580-1651) was an Austrian-Italian virtuoso performer and composer of the early Baroque period. A prolific and highly original composer, Kapsberger is chiefly remembered today for his lute and theorbo (chitarrone) music, which was seminal in the development of these as solo instruments. Nothing is known about Kapsberger's date and place of birth. After 1605 Kapsberger moved to Rome, where he quickly attained a reputation as a brilliant virtuoso, cultivated connections with various powerful individuals and organizations, worked with numerous important composers (such as Girolamo Frescobaldi and Stefano Landi) and poets and organized "academies" in his house, which were counted among the "wonders of Rome". Around 1609 he started publishing his music with more than a dozen collections of work appearing during the next ten years.

Tarquinio Merula (1595-1665) was an Italian composer, organist, and violinist of the early Baroque era. He was born in Buzet, Istria, and probably received early musical training in Cremona where he was mainly active, even though stylistically he was a member of the Venetian school. He was one of the most progressive Italian composers of the early 17th century, especially in applying newly developed techniques to sacred music. Merula was a key figure in the early development of several forms which were to mature later in the Baroque era: the aria, the sonatas da chiesa and da camera, variations on a ground bass, and the sinfonia. He was the first to write motets for solo voice, accompanied by strings. Some of his music is reminiscent of the concertato style of Giovanni Gabrieli, and a modern sense of tonality prevails throughout.

Marco Uccellini (1603/10-1680) was an Italian Baroque violinist and composer. His life, like many composers of the 17th century, is not well documented, however enough information exists to create a rough biography. He was born into a noble family in Forlì, went to study at the monastery in Assisi with another notable early violinist-composer Giovanni Battista Buonamente sometime in the early 1630s, worked shortly in Modena and finally got employed as the maestro di cappella at the Farnese court in Parma, where he lived and worked until his death. Mainly having composed instrumental music, his output of secular music for solo violin is considered to have been important in the rise of independent instrumental classical music and in the development of violin technique (virtuosic runs, leaps, and forays into high positions), expanding the instrument's technical capabilities and expressive range. Like other 17th-century Italian sonatas, Uccellini's consist of short contrasting sections (frequently dances) that flow one into another. Uccellini's innovations influenced other violinist-composers such as Johann Heinrich Schmelzer, Heinrich Ignaz Biber, and Johann Jakob Walther.

Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583-1643) was an Italian composer and virtuoso keyboard player. Born in the Duchy of Ferrara, he was one of the most important composers of keyboard music in the late Renaissance and early Baroque periods. A child prodigy, Frescobaldi studied under Luzzasco Luzzaschi in Ferrara, was later appointed organist of St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican, a focal point of power for the Cappella Giulia (an important musical organisation). Frescobaldi's printed collections contain some of the most influential music of the 17th century. His work influenced Johann Jakob Froberger, Johann Sebastian Bach, Henry Purcell, and other major composers. Pieces from his celebrated collection of liturgical organ music, Fiori musicali (1635), were used as models of strict counterpoint as late as the 19th century.

Antonio Bertali (1605-1669) was an Italian composer and violinist of the Baroque era. Born in Verona, he received early music education from Stefano Bernardi. In 1624, he was employed in Vienna by Emperor Ferdinand II as court musician, and later as Kapellmeister. Bertali's compositions are in the manner of other northern Italian composers of the time and include operas, oratorios, many liturgical works, and chamber music. Particularly his operas are notable for establishing the tradition of Italian opera seria in Vienna. Approximately half of his work is now lost; copies survive are currently in possession of Vienna's Hofbibliothek, the library of the Kremsmünster Abbey and the Kroměříž archive. He died in Vienna in 1669.

Biagio Marini (1594-1663) was an Italian virtuoso violinist and composer in the first half of the seventeenth century. Marini was born in Brescia and may have studied with his uncle Giacinto Bondioli. Having travelled throughout his life, his works were printed and influential throughout the European musical world. He wrote both instrumental and vocal music, but is better known for his innovative instrumental compositions, contributing to the early development of the string idiom by expanding the performance range of the solo and accompanied violin, incorporating slur, double and even triple stopping, and was the first who explicitly notated tremolo. He was also among the first composers after Marco Uccellini, to call for scordatura tunings. At least some, and perhaps a great deal, of his output is lost, in addition to his violin works, he wrote music for the cornett, dulcian, and sackbut.

Giovanni Antonio Pandolfi Mealli (1624-ca.1687) was an Italian composer and violinist. Pandolfi was born in Montepulciano, Tuscany in 1624. He is believed to have trained as a musician in Perugia and moved to Innsbruck in 1652. He wrote sonatas Op. 2 and 3 there, which are dedicated to court musicians of the court of Ferdinand Charles, Archduke of Austria in Innsbruck, where he got employed in 1660. He left Innsbruck in 1662, and took a position in Messina, Sicily. Of Pandolfi's works, his two collections of sonatas for violin and harpsichord (Op. 3 and Op. 4) published 1660 and his trio sonatas (Sonate Cioè Balletti) published 1669 have survived; they are at the Civic Museum of Bologna. No trace is known of Pandolfi's Op. 1 and 2. He ran to Madrid after murdering castrato Giovanni Marquett in Messina on 21 December 1675, following a political argument in the Duomo. There are no references to him after the year 1687, which may be the year of his death.

Venue

Snežnik Castle

The romantic Snežnik Castle in Notranjska is one of the most beautiful castles in Slovenia. A stroll through the four castle floors evokes the atmosphere of 150 years ago because rooms boast genuine furniture and household objects from the latter half of the 19th century.

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