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Simone Vallerotonda (IT)

When: 14. 8. 2019 at 20:30

L'ultimo romano: Lutenists and guitarists from Rome between 17th and 18th centruries

Ticket order:

Ticket price: 10 - 25 EUR

Festibus: Ljubljana (Hala Tivoli) - Soteska at 17:15. Price: 10 EUR. | Zagreb - Soteska at 17:00. Price: 10 EUR.

Simone Vallerotonda (IT): archlute, baroque guitar

L'ultimo romano: Lutenists and guitarists from Rome between 17th and 18th centruries

 

Artists’ message to visitors

 

The "L'ultimo romano" program is dedicated to the eponymous solo album, which I recorded in Italy in the winter of 2016, in the Palazzo dei Papi in Viterbo, an extraordinary location. I am very attached to this record, it was important for me, for several reasons. The program that I will propose in concert at the Seviqc Brežice Festival will include music by composer Giovanni Zamboni romano, the protagonist of the album, and other lutenists and guitarists from Rome in the 17th and 18th centuries. This repertoire is wonderful, of extraordinary immediacy… density, rigor, majesty and expressive frankness. I will play archlute and guitar, “star” instruments of the Baroque, conjure up those both facets, those eternal traits that went through the centuries without ever going out of style because of their timeless character. They revive the lost sound of a city that still nowadays, if perhaps more softly and secretly, is reflected in them.

 

About the project

 

In order to understand Roman music, one should consider the cityscape: the many churches, the majestic ancient ruins which – perfectly inserted into the urban fabric, produce a spectacular stratification of centuries – the large green spaces, the colour of the palaces, the generous light, the dazzlingly clear sky. Opulence, solemnity and ironic lightness are the foundations upon which the Roman music school is built. From Renaissance to the Baroque age – overriding the diversity of individual styles – this basic code lives on: solemnity and gravity plus a certain crafty and carefree lightness. Archlute and guitar, “star” instruments of the Baroque, conjure up those both facets, those eternal traits that went through the centuries without ever going out of style because of their timeless character. They revive the lost sound of a city that still nowadays, if perhaps more softly and secretly, is reflected in them.

 

 

Simone Vallerotonda

 

Born in Rome in 1983, he started studying the classical guitar. At age 18, deeply in love with early music, he bought a lute without any idea on how to play it. Then he had lute tuition from Andrea Damiani at the "Santa Cecilia" Conservatory in Rome, where he graduated with the highest marks. He subsequently obtained a Master's Degree in theorbo and Baroque Guitar at the "Staatliche Hochschule für Musik" in Trossingen (Germany) under the guidance of Rolf Lislevand, also with the highest marks. Once again with full honours, he graduated in Philosophy at the "Tor Vergata" University of Rome, submitting a PhD dissertation about the relationships between 18th-century music and the French Philosophes. In 2011, he ranked first in the soloists’ class of the International Lute Competition "Maurizio Pratola", also obtaining the highest prize in the chamber music section from REMA (Réseau Européen de Musique Ancienne). He appeared at outstanding theatres and concert venues in the Italia, Europe, USA, Australia, South America, Far East and He is a regular guest at the most prestigious Festivals. He has recorded for major radio and television broadcasters such as RAI, ABC, BBC, Mezzo, France Musique, Radio4, Art, Polskie Radio, Kulturradio, RSI, Radio Classica, Vatican Radio, as well as for the labels Naïve, Sony, Erato, EMI, Decca, Amadeus, Brilliant, Aparté, E Lucevan Le Stelle Records, Arcana Outhere Music. In addition to his soloist’s activity, he takes part as a continuo player in various ensembles including: Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, L’Arpeggiata, Les Ambassadeurs, Imaginarium Ensemble, Mare Nostrum, Il Pomo d’Oro. He teaches Lute at the "Antonio Scontrino" Conservatory of Music in Trapani (IT). In 2014 he founded "I Bassifondi", his own proprietary ensemble offering a 17th-18th century repertoire for guitar, theorbo and lute with continuo. Their debut album "Alfabeto falso” was nominated in the ICMA 2018 (International Classical Music Award) among the best baroque instrumental records.

www.simonevallerotonda.com/ | Facebook

Concert programme

Lorenzino romano del liuto (1552-1590)

Fantasia

(Thesaurus Harmonicus, Köln 1603)

 

Hieronimus Kapsberger (1580-1651)

Toccata VI

Gagliarda V

(Libro I d’intavolatura di lauto, Roma 1611)

 

Anonymus (17.cent.)

Passacaglia

(Libro di leuto del Doni, XVII)

 

Tommaso Marchetti romano (?-17.cent.)

Mal francese mi tormenta

(Libro I d’intavolatura della chitarra spagnola, Roma 1660)

 

Ferdinando Valdambrini romano (17.cent.)

Mamma lo scorpiò

(Libro I & II di chitarra, Roma 1646)

 

Ferdinando Valdambrini romano (17.cent.)

Passacaglia

(Libro I & II di chitarra, Roma 1646)

 

Tommaso Marchetti romano (?-17.cent.)

Clorida

(Libro I d’intavolatura della chitarra spagnola, Roma 1660)

 

*******

 

Giovanni Zamboni romano (17.cent.)

(Sonate d’intavolatura di leuto, Lucca 1718)

 

Sonata VIII

Arpeggio / Allemanda / Giga / Sarabanda / Minuetto

 

Sonata VI

Alemanda / Giga / Sarabanda / Gavotta

 

Sonata XI

Grave / Current / Sarabanda / Minuet / Ceccona

 

 

The contrapuntal rigour of the "Roman school", the immediate lightness of fashionable songs played on the guitar, lightspeed virtuosity, corteous and tuneful grace: those are the colours that paint the great fresco on the Eternal City. Since the late 16th century and well into to the 18th, such authors as Lorenzino, Kapsberger, Valdambrini, Zamboni – who proudly style themselves “romano” next to their name – use to display, despite their diverse individual characteristics, the same compositional spirit; one made of density, rigour, majesty and expressive directness. In order to understand Roman music, one should consider the cityscape: the many churches, the majestic ancient ruins which – perfectly inserted into the urban fabric, produce a spectacular stratification of centuries – the large green spaces, the colour of the palaces, the generous light, the dazzlingly clear sky. All those features, mixing “modern” Baroque with the Antique, make the alleys of downtown Rome the exact mirror of grave counterpoint combined with the melodic clarity of the voices. Opulence, solemnity and ironic lightness are the foundations upon which the Roman music school is built. From Renaissance to the Baroque age – overriding the diversity of individual styles – this basic code lives on: solemnity and gravity plus a certain crafty and carefree lightness. Archlute and guitar, “star” instruments of the Baroque, conjure up those both facets, those eternal traits that went through the centuries without ever going out of style because of their timeless character. They revive the lost sound of a city that still nowadays, if perhaps more softly and secretly, is reflected in them.

Venue

Soteska, Devil's tower

The most interesting jewels of Slovenia's landscape are very often those that are shrouded in a veil of mystery. One such place is the Devil's Tower in Soteska, a little village between two forested plateaux. The tower has stood here for over three hundred years, a place of entertainment and sinful pleasure.

Partners

FESTIBUS

The price of coach provided for all concerts from Ljubljana and Zagreb is 10€. Departure from Hala Tivoli and Lisinski Hall.