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I Solisti Ambrosiani (IT)

When: 22. 8. 2019 at 20:30

We kindly invite you to I Solisti Ambrosiani concert!

Ticket order:

Ticket price: 10 - 25 EUR

Festibus: Ljubljana (Hala Tivoli) - Brežice at 17:15. Price: 10 EUR. | Zagreb - Brežice at 17:00. Price: 10 EUR

I Solisti Ambrosiani (IT):

Tullia Pedersoli (IT): soprano

Davide Belosio (IT): violin

Claudio Frigerio (IT): cello

Emma Bolamperti (IT): harpischord 

 

Caldara’s Cantatas & Sonatas. Venetian lights and shadows in the Caldara’s Cantatas & Sonatas

Newly discovered cantatas and sonatas of Antonio Caldara as part of the first world recordings. 

 

Artists’ message to visitors

The Venetian composer Antonio Caldara is among the best known composers of his age, remembered today especially for the vast and valuable vocal production: operas, oratories, cantatas, who testify how he was able to receive and to exploit the Scarlatti’s Neapolitan lesson, in addition to the Venetian tradition.

The program proposed (Six violin Sonatas and two soprano Cantatas), was recently recorded in first world recording by I Solisti Ambrosiani, and it represents the most fortunate phase of the compositional parable of the Venetian author. The cantatas are part of a handwritten collection of 12 compositions (6 for soprano and 6 for contralto, such as was customary), now preserved in Dresden and dedicated to the Prince Elector of Saxony. Copyist was Antonio Maccarinelli, active in Vienna in the same years of Caldara.

www.isolistiambrosiani.com/

 

About the project

“Venetian lights and shadows in the Caldara’s Cantatas & Sonatas”

This proposal includes some First World Recordings (“CALDARA SONATAS & CANTATAS FOR SOPRANO, VIOLIN AND CONTINUO”, Edited by UraniaRecords, 2019)

Born in Venice in 1670, Antonio Caldara is among the best known composers of his age, remembered today especially for the vast and valuable vocal production: operas, oratories, cantatas, who testify how he was able to receive and to exploit the melodic lesson of Alessandro Scarlatti, in addition to the Venetian tradition that belongs to Monteverdi and Cavalli. Instrumental production is less frequented, than includes six Sonatas for violin and b.c., which have reached us in a posthumous, very interesting manuscript preserved in Vienna. The program proposes the complete execution of these Sonatas, recently recorded in first world recording by the baroque ensemble I Solisti Ambrosiani, together with two Cantatas for soprano and violin composed by Caldara in 1719, at the beginning of that Viennese period which is the most fortunate phase of the compositional parable of the Venetian author. The cantatas are part of a handwritten collection of 12 compositions (6 for soprano and 6 for contralto, such as was customary), now preserved in Dresden and dedicated to the Prince Elector of Saxony. Copyist was Antonio Maccarinelli, active in Vienna in the same years of Caldara.

I Solisti Ambrosiani (IT)

I Solisti Ambrosiani is an Italian ensemble specialized in ancient repertoire on original instruments. The ensemble has made several recordings, appreciated by critics. The last Cds about Albinoni and Caldara, include some Violin Sonatas & Soprano Cantatas in world first recording.

Concert programme

Antonio Caldara (1670-1736)

Cantata con violini unissoni con Soprano “Innocente cor mio...” (1)

Rec “Innocente cor mio...” / Allegro “Non fidarti...” / Rec “La vaga luce...” / Allegro “Temi d’Amore...”

 

(Sonata Prima) (2)

Preludio.Largo / Allegro / Alle

 

Sonata 2.da (2)

Preludio.Adagio / Alle / Alle

 

So:ta 3:a (2)

Andante / Alle / Allegro

 

*******

 

So:ta 4:a (2)

Preludio / Allegro

 

So:ta V.a (2)

Aria.Preludio.Largo / Allegro Allegro

 

So:ta VI.a (2)

Preludio.Largo / Alle / (?)

 

Cantata Sesta con violini unissoni a Soprano “Risoluto son già...” (1)

Rec “Risoluto son già...” / Allegro “Arma frodi strali...” / Rec “Quel panico spavento...” / Risoluto “Guerra guerra allarmi allarmi”

 

(1)   Cantate a voce sola con violini, e senza. Dedicate all’Altezza Reale di Carlo Federico Principe Elettorale di Sassonia da Antonio Caldara vice maestro di Cappella di Sua M[ae]stà C[esa]rea e Catt[oli]ca

(2)   Sonate Da Camera Del Sig. Antonio Caldara A Violino, e Violonzello

 

Born in Venice in 1670, Antonio Caldara is among the most popular composers of his time, and he’s remembered nowadays especially for his vast – and excellent – vocal production: operas, oratorios, cantatas, which witness his ability of receiving and making the most of Alessandro Scarlatti’s teaching, together with the Monteverdi and Cavalli’s Venetian tradition. Less known – but not less important – his instrumental production, which brings to light his natural talent towards the art of composition, is the result of his extraordinary creativity which made him write about three and a half thousand works. Eclectic music character, he first was an author and then a singer, a violinist and a cellist at the San Marco Cathedral, in his hometown Venice; later he travelled extensively and in 1699 he was named “Maestro di Cappella, da Chiesa e da Teatro” of the last duke of Mantua, Ferdinando Carlo Gonzaga, due to his reputation of being a talented singer and player of “different kinds of instruments”, as well as a fine contrapuntalist.

In the following years, Caldara made contact with the most important musicians of his time (from Corelli to the two Scarlatti’s, from Haendel to Pasquini), thanks to his friendship with great patrons like, among all, Cardinal Pamphili and Cardina Ottoboni and the marquis Ruspoli in Rome.

Towards the end of his international career he became the “vicemaestro di cappella” at the Imperial Court in Vienna, starting from January 1717, with a salary even more substantial than the one of the maestro di cappella. His already strong natural creativity was highly stimulated by the special attention that the Emperor showed him, as he liked Caldara more than any other composers to the point that he made him his personal music teacher: there is in fact evidence of the participation of Charles VI and his imperial family in the live performances of his operas; for example, in 1724, the emperor himself played the harpsichord to direct the Euristeo, to which only members of the highest nobility were invited.

Caldara, whom continued composing to end of his life, died in Vienna on 27th December 1736 and he was buried in the St. Stephen’s Cathedral. After his death, several of his operas and oratorios were performed, showing the great importance of his work.

The very large corpus of Caldara’s instrumental operas includes six chamber Sonatas for violin and continuo. It came to us on a very interesting posthumous manuscript preserved in Vienna, […].

The actual writing of the works included in the collection is quite coherent in its own making while a special significance is given to the cello part (instrument he was excellent at), as specified in the title “Chamber sonatas by mister Antonio Caldara for violin and cello”. Clearly, this doesn’t diminish the presence of all other instruments engaged in the realization of the continuo – which otherwise would seem impoverished from a harmonic level, as well a timbric one, being the cello for its own nature mainly melodic – but it emphasise a kind of writing which, instead of relying on the mere musical accompaniment of the soloist kind, gives preference to a dialogue among instruments of a contrapuntal character, really appreciated by the audience beyond the Alps. This can reasonably lead to think that this collection belongs to the so-called Baroque period in Vienna, even though it’s not possible to date it accurately, having found just one posthumous copy.

In the flow of moments where the different sonatas articulate it’s also possible to find, with a certain frequency, reminiscences from Corelli’s work as the sound intertwine, as well as more obvious homage to this composer – that he met during his stay in Rome – in the ending of the Sonata VI.

The two chamber cantatas “Risoluto son già” and “Innocente cor mio” for soprano, violin and continuo, are part of a manuscript collection of twelve compositions (six for soprano and six for contralto) today preserved in Dresda.

In the manuscript, the Prince Elector of Saxony indicated that this work comes from the period where Caldara worked at the emperial court. Together with his regular job at court, in fact, the composer used to fulfil the requests from other princes and this dedication, according to the customs of the time, shows, with some Hyperboles, the author’s submission and dedication to his client:

“I’m not going to be ashamed to present you, dear serene highness Royal Prince, before your eyes the weak homage of the annexed cantatas, being Your Royal Highness, like our magnanimous ancestors, always a protector of this, which finds its place even among the liberal arts, and which has the advantage of being favourably distinguished by the first kings of our century […] however since it’s custom of the humble to not be in the presence of the Great Princes without supplications, I shrink to implore Your Royal Highness His sovereign Protection, accompanied by His revered signs of attention before which I bow. Of Your Royal Highness, your most humble, most devoted, most obsequious servant Antonio Caldara.”

The copy used for this recording, most likely dated 1719, has been preserved at the Sächsische Landesbibliothek – Staats – und Universitäsbibliothek Dresden (Mus2170-J-1). Marc’Antonio Maccarinelli, active in Venice in the same years as Caldara, was its copyist.

The texts, which reflect the taste of the period, are focused of the theme of love, inviting the audience to escape it being a feeling that, in exchange of fleeting joys, gives in return pain and mystery difficult to recover from. The vocal composition alternates moments of agility to moments where the melody give way to a more intensive lyricism, effectively underlined by the intervention of the violin.

Tullia Pedersoli

(English translation Francesca Pirrone)

Venue

Brežice, Brežice Castle

The two-storey castle is the mightiest building in Brežice, built in the middle of the 16th century in the site of the castle which was burnt down in 1515, in time of the great peasant revolt.

Partners

FESTIBUS

The price of coach provided for all concerts from Ljubljana and Zagreb is 10€. Departure from Hala Tivoli and Lisinski Hall.